The 10th week of pregnancy

Following the 10th week of pregnancy, your cardiovascular system is adapting to growing your baby. Your heart is pumping more blood into your circulatory system and throughout your pregnancy your midwife will monitor your blood pressure regularly.

Pregnant mum stretching and enjoying fresh air in her maternity sports attire

Your uterus is now the size of a grapefruit and can be clearly seen on ultrasound.

In the 10th week of pregnancy, your baby is the size of a small strawberry. It is about 2-3 cm in length and, at 4 grams, has already doubled its weight compared to the previous week.

  • The first tooth buds develop in the baby's mouth in week 10.
  • Your baby’s forehead and nose are more visible on ultrasound.
  • This is the time when your baby’s mouth, lips, jaw and palate are formed.
  • Your baby’s face is starting to take a more baby-like appearance.
  • By 10 weeks your baby’s heart now beats strongly.
  • Your baby’s limbs are growing and fingers form, which give those unique fingerprints for life.

Looking after yourself

Daily exercise, such as walking, yoga or swimming, is important to keep active and help your body adjust to providing nutrition and oxygen for your growing baby. Now is not the time to take up new hobbies, but if you want to become more active discuss with your midwife or doctor about exercising safely and healthily.

Some women now start to feel that their usual clothes and waist bands are getting a little more restrictive, so you may feel more comfortable wearing clothes with a bump panel.

It is common for you to have a first proper meeting with your midwife/ obstetrician during the last few weeks of your first trimester. You will probably have lots of questions and you may find it useful to note down some key questions that you want to discuss at your appointment.

Note:

*The information on height and weight are average values that cannot be applied to individual cases. Every baby develops individually.

References

1. Marshall, J.E. and Raynor, M.D. (2020) Myles Textbook for Midwives. 17th ed. London: Elsevier